Precarious Inclusions; Re-Imagining Disability, Race, Masculinity and Nation in My Name Is Khan

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Nadia Kanani

Keywords

disability, race, nation

Abstract

This paper will critically examine how dominant cultural scripts about disability are reinforced and complicated in the Bollywood film, My Name is Khan (Johar, 2010).  An examination of the film's themes demonstrates that My Name is Khan allows for a nuanced analysis of disability, race, masculinity and nation.

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