Keep It Right - Homeland: The Female Body, Disability, and Nation

Main Article Content

Joelle Rouleau

Keywords

feminism, disability, Homeland (TV series)

Abstract

This article will look at how Homeland’s main character, Carrie Mathison, is used as a metaphor for the current cultural state of fear in the post-9/11 United States by demonstrating the effects of internalized sexism and ableism within the representation of a disabled woman’s experience in the articulation of her gender, race, disability, and sexuality.

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