Psychosocial Adjustment of Women with Work-related Disabilities in Rural China

Main Article Content

Karen Lo-Hui
Lilian Luo
Xiaoshan Yang

Keywords

Gender, China, disability experience

Abstract

The impact of gender roles on the psychosocial adjustment of women in rural China with work related disabilities is explored. The influence of economic reform, traditional family orientation, and gender expectations on the ability of women to work in rural China are discussed via three case studies. 

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