College Preparation and Participation: Reports from Individuals Who Have Speech and Mobility Disabilities

Main Article Content

Carole Isakson
Sheryl Burgstahler

Keywords

education, speech and mobility disabilities, transition

Abstract

In this qualitative research study, nine individuals with mobility and speech disabilities reported on their experiences preparing for and participating in postsecondary education. Topics discussed include choosing a college, support from mentors and family members, self-determination, accessibility and accommodations, academic and social aspects of college, current activities and outcomes.

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