Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes about Disability in East Africa

Main Article Content

Angi Stone-MacDonald
Gretchen Digman Butera

Keywords

beliefs, East Africa, culture

Abstract

This interpretive literature review of cultural beliefs and attitudes about disability in East Africa identified themes in four categories including (a) the causes of disability, (b) attitudes towards disability, (c) treatment of people with disabilities, and (d) language about disability. Referencing the medical, social, and pluralistic frameworks for conceptualizing disability, the authors sought to compare and contrast East Africa with perspectives about disability common in the developed world. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.  

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