Shifting Perception: Photographing Disabled People During the Civil Rights Era

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Timothy W. Hiles

Keywords

art history, enfreakment, “other”

Abstract

During the American Civil Rights Era, photographic perception of disabled people shifted from constructs that empowered the abled “normal” to an empathetic awareness of social isolation and enfreakment. Through rhetorics of the stare, photographers demonstrated increased cognizance of what it meant to be an “other” in a society that valued homogeneity.  

 

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Image Credits

Figure 1 - Elliott Erwitt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1950.  © Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos, New York, New York

Figure 2 - Elliott Erwitt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1950.  © Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos, New York, New York

Figure 3 - Garry Winogrand, Los Angeles, 1969.  © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Figure 4 - Garry Winogrand, London, 1967.  © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

 

Abstract 163 | PDF Downloads 32 Word Downloads 3 Text Downloads 50 Figure 1: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Downloads 0 Figure 2: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Downloads 0 Figure 3: Los Angeles Downloads 0 Figure 4: London Downloads 0

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