Re-Thinking Interdependence, Subjectivity, and Politics Through the Laser Eagles Art Guild

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Chris Lee

Keywords

interdependence, arts, Unruly Salon

Abstract

This article considers how a university-based graduate seminar and a disability arts and cultural series interact to create positive combustion and render disability a little less stable in its reading. Inspired by the series entitled the Unruly Salon and the author’s own involvement with the Laser Eagles Art Guild, an arts group emphasizing the collaborations of people with disabilities and their able-bodied peers, this article offers a preliminarily discussion of the notions of interdependence and translation as they relate to, and problematize, normative understandings of disability and the autonomous subject.
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Laser Eagles Art Guild. (2008). Retrieved May 3, 2008, from http://lasereagles.org/pages/default.asp

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Paper presented February 2, 2008 at the Unruly Salons Series at University of British Columbia, Vancouver: Canada.