Illiteracy is Insecurity: Education, Technology and Disability in South Africa

Main Article Content

Charles Dube

Keywords

technology, social cohesion, security

Abstract

This treatise argues that illiteracy is insecurity and, in South Africa, education has eluded the majority of disabled people. A technology divide is intensifying the able-disabled divide that has always existed in South Africa, thus creating a “cartel of satraps” that plunges the disabled into marginalization.

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