Interdisciplinary Dialogues: Disability and Postcolonial Studies

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Clare Barker

Keywords

postcolonial literature, disability, Rushdie

Abstract

Disability is a constitutive material presence in many postcolonial societies but remains surprisingly absent as a subject of analysis in the field of Postcolonial Studies. Through a critical reading of disability in Salman Rushdie’s novel Midnight’s Children (1981), this article develops an interdisciplinary critical methodology that pays attention to disability both as an aesthetic textual device and as lived experience.

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