Deserving of Charity or Deserving of Better? The Continuing Legacy of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act for Britain’s Deaf Population

Main Article Content

Martin Atherton

Keywords

charity, deaf, voluntary welfare

Abstract

This study will outline how deaf people in Britain were treated under the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act and will argue that attitudes towards their abilities established by and in response to the New Poor Law continue to influence social policy provision and the employability of deaf people to this day.

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